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Investing in Education for Liberation

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Dear Network Member,

The Education for Liberation Network believes that education means providing opportunities—particularly for low-income youth and youth of color—to understand and challenge the injustices they face. Our commitment to teach freedom feels increasingly urgent with each passing day. As you work and plan to meet the needs in your own communities and spaces, the Network is here to support that work and connect it and you to the national stage. 
 
In order for us to reinforce and strengthen that work, we need people to help sustain us financially.  Please consider donating to our independent organization - one not owned by a foundation, corporation, or institution.  Our independence allows our work to be driven by the priorities of grassroots educators, activists, and youth, and we are able to actively create space for local work to have national impact.   

 

monthly sustainer button              make a one time donation

 Be sure to check out our thank you gifts below!
 


Donating to the Education for Liberation Network means that you are sustaining the organization that convenes the Free Minds Free People conference, that amplifies efforts like the National Student Bill of Rights and the No History is Illegal campaign, and that produces our annual plan book for teachers, Planning to Change the World.  We connect people to people, people to knowledge, and people to resources.  None of it is possible without your support. As we begin 2018, we look forward to continuing our network's efforts to sustain, connect, and support folks in the struggle for educational justice. 

Our goal is to raise $20,000 by the end of the year. Can you help us reach that goal?

We have some great thank you gifts to express our appreciation for your support (see below to learn more). Click here to become a monthly sustainer or make a one-time donation or see below to learn how to pay by check.

A contribution to the Network goes a long way. As a large Network with lean staff and little overhead, we accomplish a lot on a very small budget. We achieve this through strategic partnerships with allies and through the hard work of Network volunteers. The effect of your contribution is multiplied because it impacts not only the Network as an organization, but the many organizations and individuals across the country that our work helps support. See below to learn more about our impact.

Please invest in the future of education for liberation by making as generous a contribution as you are able. While we have thank you gifts for certain donation amounts, no donation is too small and any contribution is greatly appreciated.

In love and struggle,

Thomas

Donate to the Education for Liberation Network

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IMPACT





Free Minds, Free People logo
1,100 people attended the 2017 
conference in Baltimore





2017-18 Cover

3,500 educators use the 
plan book nationwide




 Hands
 More than 13,000 people reached by our work

 

We are more than just numbers. The network impacts people in many ways: 

"Education for Liberation has done an excellent job of gathering the stakeholders and promoting dialogue which encourages people across the United States to take back control of our means of education."
—Social worker, MI

Free Minds, Free People "was a great conference. I loved it. It was like we all had something in common and we shared our struggles and achievements. Inspiring."
—High school student, UT

"I love the dates and classroom ideas. [Planning to Change the World] is one of the most amazing resources for social justice I have ever used, and I teach 1st grade."
—Debbie, elementary school teacher

"Our youth learned so much and have begun to think critically about issues that affect them yet they didn't think about, like incarceration." 
—Youth worker, LA

"The conference gave us time to think big, which is always helpful and necessary."
—Community-based educator/organizer, IL

The plan book "understands that education is freedom and makes me feel supported in the classroom by reminding me that I'm not alone in my struggles for social justice."
Samantha, middle school teacher

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SAYING THANKS 

For donations of $50 or more:

 

Phi Book

A Different Pond
written by Bao Phi, illustrated by Thi Bui (SORRY THIS GIFT IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE)
Acclaimed poet Bao Phi delivers a powerful, honest glimpse into a relationship between father and son?and between cultures, old and new. A Different Pond is an unforgettable story about a simple event a long-ago fishing trip. As a young boy, Bao Phi awoke early, hours before his father's long workday began, to fish on the shores of a small pond in Minneapolis. Unlike many other anglers, Bao and his father fished for food, not recreation. A successful catch meant a fed family. Between hope-filled casts, Bao’s father told him about a different pond in their homeland of Vietnam.

ConfrontingRacism

Confronting Racism in Teacher Education: Counternarratives of Critical Practice
edited by Bree Picower and Rita Kohli (SORRY THIS GIFT IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE)

Confronting Racism in Teacher Education aims to transform systematic and persistent racism through in-depth analyses of racial justice struggles and strategies in teacher education. By bringing together counternarratives of critical teacher educators, the editors of this volume present key insights from both individual and collective experiences of advancing racial justice. Written for teacher educators, higher education administrators, policy makers, and others concerned with issues of race, the book is comprised of four parts that each represent a distinct perspective on the struggle for racial justice: contributors reflect on their experiences working as educators of Color to transform the culture of predominately White institutions, navigating the challenges of whiteness within teacher education, building transformational bridges within classrooms, and training current and inservice teachers through concrete models of racial justice. 

Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies

Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies: Teaching and Learning for Social Justice in a Changing World 
(SORRY THIS GIFT IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE)
edited by Django Paris and H. Samy Alim

Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies raises fundamental questions about the purpose of schooling in changing societies. Bringing together an intergenerational group of prominent educators and researchers, this volume engages and extends the concept of culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP)—teaching that perpetuates and fosters linguistic, literate, and cultural pluralism as part of schooling for positive social transformation. The authors propose that schooling should be a site for sustaining the cultural practices of communities of color, rather than eradicating them. Chapters present theoretically grounded examples of how educators and scholars can support Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian/Pacific Islander, South African, and immigrant students as part of a collective movement towards educational justice in a changing world. 

Bill Ayers Book

Demand the Impossible!: A Radical Manifesto 
by Bill Ayers

In an era defined by mass incarceration, endless war, economic crisis, catastrophic environmental destruction, and a political system offering more of the same, radical social transformation has never been more urgent—or seemed more remote. A manifesto for movement-makers in extraordinary times, Demand the Impossible! urges us to imagine a world beyond what this rotten system would have us believe is possible. In critiquing the world around us, insurgent educator and activist Bill Ayers uncovers cracks in that system, raising the horizons for radical change, and envisioning strategies for building the movement we need to make a world worth living in.

Electric Arches

Electric Arches
by Eve L. Ewing

Electric Arches is an imaginative exploration of Black girlhood and womanhood through poetry, visual art, and narrative prose. Blending stark realism with the surreal and fantastic, Eve L. Ewing’s narrative takes us from the streets of 1990s Chicago to an unspecified future, deftly navigating the boundaries of space, time, and reality. Ewing imagines familiar figures in magical circumstances—blues legend Koko Taylor is a tall-tale hero; LeBron James travels through time and encounters his teenage self. She identifies everyday objects—hair moisturizer, a spiral notebook—as precious icons. Her visual art is spare, playful, and poignant—a cereal box decoder ring that allows the wearer to understand what Black girls are saying; a teacher’s angry, subversive message scrawled on the chalkboard. Electric Arches invites fresh conversations about race, gender, the city, identity, and the joy and pain of growing up.

EmergentStrategy

Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds
by adrienne maree brown (SORRY THIS GIFT IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE)

Inspired by Octavia Butler's explorations of our human relationship to change, Emergent Strategy is radical self-help, society-help, and planet-help designed to shape the futures we want to live. Change is constant. The world is in a continual state of flux. It is a stream of ever-mutating, emergent patterns. Rather than steel ourselves against such change, this book invites us to feel, map, assess, and learn from the swirling patterns around us in order to better understand and influence them as they happen. This is a resolutely materialist “spirituality” based equally on science and science fiction, a visionary incantation to transform that which ultimately transforms us.

FMFP T

Free Minds, Free People T-shirt

Didn't get a chance to attend FMFP, but still want the swag? Attended but forgot to get your shirt? 

Choose Straight-Cut XL or Taper-Cut L.

From Black Lives Matter

From #BlackLivesMatter To Black Liberation
by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

The eruption of mass protests in the wake of the police murders of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Eric Garner in New York City have challenged the impunity with which officers of the law carry out violence against Black people and punctured the illusion of a postracial America. The Black Lives Matter movement has awakened a new generation of activists.In this stirring and insightful analysis, activist and scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor surveys the historical and contemporary ravages of racism and persistence of structural inequality such as mass incarceration and Black unemployment. In this context, she argues that this new struggle against police violence holds the potential to reignite a broader push for Black liberation.

Kids

The Kids: The Children of LGBTQ Parents in the USA
by Gabriela Herman

Judges, academics, and activists keep wondering how children are impacted by having gay parents. Maybe it’s time to ask the kids. For the past four years, award-winning photographer Gabriela Herman, whose mother came out when Herman was in high school and was married in one of Massachusetts’s first legal same-sex unions, has been photographing and interviewing children and young adults in America with one or more parent who identifies as lesbian, gay, trans, or queer. Building on images featured in a major article for the New York Times Sunday Review, and The Guardian and working with COLAGE, the only national organization focusing on children with LGBTQ parents, The Kids brings a vibrant energy and sensitivity to a wide range of experiences.

Pedagogy Teacher Activism

The Pedagogy of Teacher Activism: Portraits of Four Teachers for Justice
by Keith Catone (SIGNED COPY!) (SORRY THIS GIFT IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE)

Through the artful science of portraiture, The Pedagogy of Teacher Activism presents the stories of four teacher activists—how they are and have become social change agents—to uncover important pedagogical underpinnings of teacher activism. Embedded in their stories are moments of political clarity and consciousness, giving rise to their purpose as teacher activists. The narratives illuminate how both inner passions and those stirred by caring relationships with others motivate their work, while the intentional ways in which they attempt to disrupt power relations give shape to their approaches to teacher activism. Knowing their work will never truly be done and that the road they travel is often difficult, the teacher activists considered here persist because of the hope and possibility that their work might change the world. Like many pre-service educators or undergraduates contemplating teaching as a vocation, these teacher activists were not born ready for the work that they do. Yet by mining their biographical histories and trajectories of political development, this book illuminates the pedagogy of teacher activism that guides their work.

Rethink Decolonize Now Cookbook

Rethink Decolonize Now Cookbook
by Rethink

The Decolonize Now Cookbook is part of Rethink’s Food Justice Collective ongoing Monsanto Free Zone Campaign where we are fighting to get every farm and garden in New Orleans to become a Monsanto Free Zone (pesticide and GMO free). We created this cookbook because we want to help our community have access to cook fresh, healthy, and culturally reflective food. So much of our history, particularly the food growing practices that are so key to our identity, has been colonized and erased that we don’t know the richness of our traditions. These traditions are what kept us healthy, safe, and allowed us to take care of each other.

Rethink Decolonize Now T


Rethink decolonize now T-Shirt 

Rethink Free the mind T


Rethink Free the mind, the land, the people T-Shirt

Rethink Respect the youth T


Rethink Respect the Youth T-Shirt

Rethinking Sexism

Rethinking Sexism, Gender, and Sexuality
edited by Annika Butler-Wall, Kim Cosier, Rachel Harper, Jeff Sapp, Jody Sokolower, Melissa Bollow Tempel

How do you respond when a child asks, “Can a girl turn into a boy?” What if your daughter brings home school books with sexist, racist stories? What does “queering the curriculum” look like? What’s wrong with “anti-bullying” policies? What are alternatives? Rethinking Sexism, Gender, and Sexuality is a collection of inspiring stories about how to integrate feminist and LGBTQ content into curriculum, make it part of a vision for social justice, and create classrooms and schools that nurture all children and their families.  

Rules for Resistance

Rules for Resistance: Advice from Around the Globe for the Age of Trump
edited by David Cole and Melanie Wachtell-Stinnett

Some of us have been here before. Many people living today in America and around the world have direct experience with countries where an autocrat has seized control, changing everything from the tenor of daily life to the laws and constitution. Others have seen charismatic, populist leaders come to power within democracies and dramatically change the rules of the road for the public, activists, and journalists alike. In Rules for Resistance, writers from Russia, Turkey, India, Hungary, Chile, China, Canada, Italy, and elsewhere tell Americans what to expect under our own new regime, and give us guidance for living—and for resisting—in the Trump era.

Stamped from the Beginning

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America
by Ibram X. Kendi

SOME AMERICANS cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first Black president spelled the doom of racism. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America - more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists.

Troublemakers

Troublemakers: Lessons in Freedom from Young Children at School
by Carla Shalaby (Audio CD)

Troublemakers is a radical educator’s paradigm-shifting inquiry into the accepted, normal demands of school, as illuminated by moving portraits of four very young “problem children.” Former elementary school teacher Carla Shalaby delves into the everyday lives of these children to challenge the endless pursuit to moderate, punish, and medicate each child—instead of transforming our institutions, systems, and structures, large and small. By seeing school through the eyes of those who know firsthand what it means to be labeled a problem, educators, parents, and readers of all sorts will gain insight into how schools—often unintentionally—engender, exclude, and then ultimately try to erase trouble, along with the young people accused of making it. With empathetic, elegant prose, Troublemakers offers a deeply textured look at what student noncompliance signals about the environments we require students to adapt to in our schools—and how our typical expectations for young children undermine the pursuit of a free and just society. 


For donations of $75 or more
:

The New Press Bundle #1: (SORRY THIS GIFT IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE) Cutting School + Hypercapitalism

Cutting School

Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation, and the end of Public Education
by Noliwe Rooks

Public schools are among America’s greatest achievements in modern history, yet from the earliest days of tax-supported education—today a sector with an estimated budget of over half a billion dollars—there have been intractable tensions tied to race and poverty. Now, in an era characterized by levels of school segregation the country has not seen since the mid-twentieth century, cultural critic and American studies professor Noliwe Rooks provides a trenchant analysis of our separate and unequal schools and argues that profiting from our nation’s failure to provide a high-quality education to all children has become a very big business.

 

Hypercapitalism

Hypercapitalism: The Modern Economy, Its Values, and How to Change Them
by Larry Gonick and Tim Kasser

Bestselling “overeducated cartoonist” Larry Gonick has delighted readers for years with sharp, digestible, and funny accounts of everything from the history of the universe to the intricacies of calculus. Now Gonick teams up with psychologist and scholar Tim Kasser to create an accessible and trenchant cartoon guide to how global, privatizing, market-worshipping hypercapitalism threatens human well-being, social justice, and the planet. But Gonick and Kasser don’t stop at an analysis of how the economic system got out of whack—they also point the way to a healthier future.

 

 

The New Press Bundle #2: (SORRY THIS GIFT IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE) Cutting School The Responsibility of Intellectuals

Cutting School

Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation, and the end of Public Education
by Noliwe Rooks

Public schools are among America’s greatest achievements in modern history, yet from the earliest days of tax-supported education—today a sector with an estimated budget of over half a billion dollars—there have been intractable tensions tied to race and poverty. Now, in an era characterized by levels of school segregation the country has not seen since the mid-twentieth century, cultural critic and American studies professor Noliwe Rooks provides a trenchant analysis of our separate and unequal schools and argues that profiting from our nation’s failure to provide a high-quality education to all children has become a very big business.

 
 
Responsibility of Intellectuals


The Responsibility of Intellectuals (with new preface by author)
by Noam Chomsky

As a nineteen-year-old undergraduate in 1947, Noam Chomsky was deeply affected by articles about the responsibility of intellectuals written by Dwight Macdonald, an editor of Partisan Review and then of Politics. Twenty years later, as the Vietnam War was escalating, Chomsky turned to the question himself, noting that “intellectuals are in a position to expose the lies of governments” and to analyze their “often hidden intentions.” Also included in this volume is the brilliant “The Responsibility of Intellectuals Redux,” written on the tenth anniversary of 9/11, which makes the case for using privilege to challenge the state. As relevant in 2017 as it was in 1967, The Responsibility of Intellectuals reminds us that “privilege yields opportunity and opportunity confers responsibilities.” All of us have choices, even in desperate times.

 

 

The New Press Bundle #3: (SORRY THIS GIFT IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE) Hypercapitalism + The Responsibility of Intellectuals

Hypercapitalism

Hypercapitalism: The Modern Economy, Its Values, and How to Change Them
by Larry Gonick and Tim Kasser

Bestselling “overeducated cartoonist” Larry Gonick has delighted readers for years with sharp, digestible, and funny accounts of everything from the history of the universe to the intricacies of calculus. Now Gonick teams up with psychologist and scholar Tim Kasser to create an accessible and trenchant cartoon guide to how global, privatizing, market-worshipping hypercapitalism threatens human well-being, social justice, and the planet. But Gonick and Kasser don’t stop at an analysis of how the economic system got out of whack—they also point the way to a healthier future.

 

 

Responsibility of Intellectuals


The Responsibility of Intellectuals (with new preface by author)
by Noam Chomsky

As a nineteen-year-old undergraduate in 1947, Noam Chomsky was deeply affected by articles about the responsibility of intellectuals written by Dwight Macdonald, an editor of Partisan Review and then of Politics. Twenty years later, as the Vietnam War was escalating, Chomsky turned to the question himself, noting that “intellectuals are in a position to expose the lies of governments” and to analyze their “often hidden intentions.” Also included in this volume is the brilliant “The Responsibility of Intellectuals Redux,” written on the tenth anniversary of 9/11, which makes the case for using privilege to challenge the state. As relevant in 2017 as it was in 1967, The Responsibility of Intellectuals reminds us that “privilege yields opportunity and opportunity confers responsibilities.” All of us have choices, even in desperate times.

 

 

 

For donations of $100 or more:

Special Bundle #1: (SORRY THIS GIFT IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE) For the Children? + Pushout + Understanding Mass Incarceration 

Meiners

For the Children?: Protecting Innocence in a Carceral State
by Erica M. Meiners

“Childhood has never been available to all.” In her opening chapter of For the Children?, Erica R. Meiners stakes the claim that childhood is a racial category often unavailable to communities of color. According to Meiners, this is glaringly evident in the U.S. criminal justice system, where the differentiation between child and adult often equates to access to stark disparities. And what is constructed as child protection often does not benefit many young people or their communities. Placing the child at the heart of the targeted criminalization debate, For the Children? considers how perceptions of innocence, the safe child, and the future operate in service of the prison industrial complex. 

Pushout

 

Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

by Monique W. Morris

In a work that Lisa Delpit calls “imperative reading,” Monique W. Morris (Black StatsToo Beautiful for Words) chronicles the experiences of Black girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged—by teachers, administrators, and the justice system—and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish. Called “compelling” and “thought-provoking” by Kirkus ReviewsPushout exposes a world of confined potential and supports the rising movement to challenge the policies, practices, and cultural illiteracy that push countless students out of school and into unhealthy, unstable, and often unsafe futures.

kilgore

Understanding Mass Incarceration: A People’s Guide to the Key Civil Rights Struggle of Our Time
by James Kilgore

Drawing on a growing body of academic and professional work, Understanding Mass Incarceration describes in plain English the many competing theories of criminal justice—from rehabilitation to retribution, from restorative justice to justice reinvestment. In a lively and accessible style, author James Kilgore illuminates the difference between prisons and jails, probation and parole, laying out key concepts and policies such as the War on Drugs, broken-windows policing, three-strikes sentencing, the school-to-prison pipeline, recidivism, and prison privatization. Informed by the crucial lenses of race and gender, he addresses issues typically omitted from the discussion: the rapidly increasing incarceration of women, Latinos, and transgender people; the growing imprisonment of immigrants; and the devastating impact of mass incarceration on communities.

 

 

 

Special Bundle #2: (SORRY THIS GIFT IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE) Another Day in the Death of America For the Children?Pushout

Younge

Another Day in the Death of America: A Chronicle of Ten Short Lives

by Gary Younge

On an average day in America, seven children and teens will be shot dead. In Another Day in the Death of America, award-winning journalist Gary Younge tells the stories of the lives lost during one such day. It could have been any day, but he chose November 23, 2013. Black, white, and Latino, aged nine to nineteen, they fell at sleepovers, on street corners, in stairwells, and on their own doorsteps. From the rural Midwest to the barrios of Texas, the narrative crisscrosses the country over a period of twenty-four hours to reveal the full human stories behind the gun-violence statistics and the brief mentions in local papers of lives lost.


Meiners

For the Children?: Protecting Innocence in a Carceral State

by Erica M. Meiners

“Childhood has never been available to all.” In her opening chapter of For the Children?, Erica R. Meiners stakes the claim that childhood is a racial category often unavailable to communities of color. According to Meiners, this is glaringly evident in the U.S. criminal justice system, where the differentiation between child and adult often equates to access to stark disparities. And what is constructed as child protection often does not benefit many young people or their communities. Placing the child at the heart of the targeted criminalization debate, For the Children? considers how perceptions of innocence, the safe child, and the future operate in service of the prison industrial complex.

Pushout

 

Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

by Monique W. Morris

In a work that Lisa Delpit calls “imperative reading,” Monique W. Morris (Black StatsToo Beautiful for Words) chronicles the experiences of Black girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged—by teachers, administrators, and the justice system—and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish. Called “compelling” and “thought-provoking” by Kirkus ReviewsPushout exposes a world of confined potential and supports the rising movement to challenge the policies, practices, and cultural illiteracy that push countless students out of school and into unhealthy, unstable, and often unsafe futures.

 

Special Bundle #3: (SORRY THIS GIFT IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE) Being Bad Pushout + Understanding Mass Incarceration

Laura

Being Bad: My Baby Brother and the School-to-Prison Pipeline 
by Crystal T. Laura

Being Bad will change the way you think about the social and academic worlds of Black boys. In a poignant and harrowing journey from systems of education to systems of criminal justice, the author follows her brother, Chris, who has been designated a “bad kid” by his school, a “person of interest” by the police, and a “gangster” by society. Readers first meet Chris in a Chicago jail, where he is being held in connection with a string of street robberies. We then learn about Chris through insiders’ accounts that stretch across time to reveal key events preceding this tragic moment. Together, these stories explore such timely issues as the under-education of Black males, the place and importance of scapegoats in our culture, the on-the-ground reality of zero tolerance, the role of mainstream media in constructing Black masculinity, and the critical relationships between schools and prisons.

Pushout

 

Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

by Monique W. Morris

In a work that Lisa Delpit calls “imperative reading,” Monique W. Morris (Black StatsToo Beautiful for Words) chronicles the experiences of Black girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged—by teachers, administrators, and the justice system—and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish. Called “compelling” and “thought-provoking” by Kirkus ReviewsPushout exposes a world of confined potential and supports the rising movement to challenge the policies, practices, and cultural illiteracy that push countless students out of school and into unhealthy, unstable, and often unsafe futures.

 

kilgoreUnderstanding Mass Incarceration: A People’s Guide to the Key Civil Rights Struggle of Our Time
by James Kilgore

Drawing on a growing body of academic and professional work, Understanding Mass Incarceration describes in plain English the many competing theories of criminal justice—from rehabilitation to retribution, from restorative justice to justice reinvestment. In a lively and accessible style, author James Kilgore illuminates the difference between prisons and jails, probation and parole, laying out key concepts and policies such as the War on Drugs, broken-windows policing, three-strikes sentencing, the school-to-prison pipeline, recidivism, and prison privatization. Informed by the crucial lenses of race and gender, he addresses issues typically omitted from the discussion: the rapidly increasing incarceration of women, Latinos, and transgender people; the growing imprisonment of immigrants; and the devastating impact of mass incarceration on communities.

 

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HOW TO CONTRIBUTE

To donate online please visit www.edliberation.org and click "Donate."

Please make checks payable to The Chicago Freedom School (the network's fiscal sponsor). Mail the check to: Thomas Nikundiwe, Education for Liberation Network, 15493 Piedmont Street, Detroit MI 48223. If you would like a gift, please be sure to indicate which one when you mail the check.

 

A HUGE thank you to all our friends and allies who donated thank you gifts for this fundraising campaign:

Bill Ayers, Capstone Young Readers, Keith Catone, Eve Ewing, Haymarket Books, Ibram X. Kendi, Crystal T. Laura, Karen Marshall, Erica Meiners, Nation Books, Peter Lang Publishing, Bao Phi, Rethink New Orleans, Rethinking Schools, Carla Shalaby, Jody Sokolower, Teachers College Press, The New Press, and Gary Younge.

 
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